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  1. 285 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 
    Mario T. Lanza supported this idea  · 
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    If you're adding OR and NOT, you'll need AND and PARANS in order to accommodate order of precedence. I agree that you might not want to use the words, but perhaps JavaScript operators like || and && and (). Checkvist is for geeks after all.

    Also, if you're going to add this, you might add named searches.

    You type:
    @next = ^today || ^tomorrow || ^now || ^asap || ^overdue || #now || #soon
    @next
    @next =

    The first defines and executes a named search. The second executes it. The third deletes it.

  2. 157 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza supported this idea  · 
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    This is a tickler file. The more stuff you have to visually scan (even if only when viewing invalidated tasks) the more taxing. Rather, you deliberately push something out of sight and out of mind for a time (similar to the repeating tasks implementation). Deferring tasks (actually hiding them!) with dates saves one from visually sifting heaping mounds of invalidates tasks when they're unhidden. You're already using a sort of start date with repeating tasks (e.g. Re-open n days before the next due date). You could get by reusing this mechanism.

    One would need a means of viewing all deferred tasks. The Due view displays tasks based on due date. Displaying deferred tasks (start date not yet arrived) would require some kind of visibility toggling. Regardless of implementation the key ask here is date-based hiding.

    Once implemented, a snooze command ("s") could easily bump a start date out by some value in the user settings (e.g. a month). Thus, "s" would snooze a task a month and "s6" would snooze it 6. The start date could not be pushed past the due date.

  3. 26 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    Checkvist is already fast with this.

    I have an "In" list. Regardless of what list I'm on I just press ENTER (assuming an item is already highlighted) and this gives me a new item. I type in my random though and press ENTER, then up, then move ("mm") it to the In box. I do this daily and it's fast despite the extra keystrokes.

    Not as nice as having a dedicated inbox, but it'll get you what you want in the interim.

  4. 7 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza supported this idea  · 
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    This would also be useful for my use case. I regularly move items to the top or bottom of the list as a matter of prioritizing.

  5. 7 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 
  6. 25 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    Kill two birds with one stone:
    https://checkvist.uservoice.com/forums/2121-checkvist-web/suggestions/9365781-view-multiple-lists-or-focuses-at-once-in-arrang
    If you could create named list sets (lists grouped as a set of panes columns) they would work fine as kanban swim lanes.You could still use `mm` to move items between lanes or some kind of switch list/lane command similar to the `ll` command to stay on the same screen.

  7. 4 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    An important concern is working tasks is balance. When you're trying to prioritize where to spend your time next it pays to know where you've already spent your time. You can gain important insights just being able to see how frequently you've worked a task. The ultimate aim of tracking how much you worked on something and when is to aid in planning and to provide motivation (to gamify work).The trouble is completed tasks -- which could otherwise easily track time spent and date completed -- are regularly purged (if only to clear the list). If completed tasks could simply be hidden and not purged, then it would be possible to derive time spent and to provide a host of interesting feedback mechanisms (don't break the chain, see how balanced you are between family tasks and work tasks, etc.). The idea in IT is data is valuable for analysis but with sending completed tasks to the trash instead of a recycle bin, good and useful data is being lost.

  8. 21 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    I agree that implementing a good looking ui is a concern, but I think it's possible. Here's a possibility:

    First I like Sthithapragnan's suggestion of extending tags into pairs. I've see the paran syntax in TaskPaper and I like it. An alternative is to use a colon -- e.g. #taskaddedby:xxx. The colon syntax is easier to enter since the user doesn't need to remember a closing paran.

    It is also possible to nicely display these in the ui. They are after all, just tags. Just display the value portion in a different color. The next issue is that if too many valued tags are entered it may clutter the ui. This could be handled by collapsing and expanding the complete set of valued tags.
    (Firstly, simple tags with no values would appear just as they already do. These would be followed by the valued tags.) The user can add a setting on each list to indicate which valued tags (listing their keys) are shown by default. The set of valued pairs would have a three way toggle: show the default ones, show all, show none. These correlate to what Windows calls: normal, minimize, maximize. A simple ellipses could be used used to help convey that some are being collapsed out of view.

    Using valued tags allows limitless extension since you can basically add whatever attributes you want (NoSQL style). It also accommodates the request for adding columns. Since displaying valued tags as columns is nothing more than another way of viewing them. So they could either appear similarly to normal tags as valued tags or as columnar values.

    There would be no need to define data types. Just as YAML intuitive recognizes data types by the way they're entered, so could Checkvist.

  9. 235 votes
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    Dear Adrian, thanks for giving your vote to this issue! We’ll try hard to keep the user interface simple – promise!

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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    I agree with James' sentiment. Checkvist is a cut above other outliners. It's elegant, useful, and fast. Speed always ranks near the top in providing a pleasant user experience so great job in providing exactly that!

    And yet, I read lots of requests here for different views of the data. Some want to see their outlines as mind maps, some as Kanban boards, some in Gantt charts, etc. The sentiment is that users sometimes want different views of their data, which I get and completely concur with. As an I.T. guy myself I have long been contemplating how to address this kind of issue and I've arrived at a reasonable solution, though it does involve some coordination with other parties.

    It starts with Dropbox or some other data host. Right now, I believe, Checkvist hosts the user data and backs up data to third parties like Dropbox. Thus, Dropbox owns a secondary copy, not a primary copy of the data.

    If the primary copy were owned by the third party and Checkvist merely provided the application for viewing and manipulating outline data files, we'd be one step closer to my proposed solution. (I once used Fargo, an outliner, that takes exactly this approach.)

    The second step is finding an ubiquitous format for outline data such as OPML. I know relatively nothing about the OPML spec other than it attempts to standardize outline data.

    What I don't know is how well third party tools like Checkvist are at utilizing the spec in a way that permits features beyond those envisioned by the authorities that oversee OPML. For example, you can export an Excel spreadsheet to CSV but this will cause a loss of features on import. I don't know how well Checkvist could function using the "ubiquitous file format" whatever it may be. Likewise, I don't know how well other apps like mind maps and Gantt charts could function using the ubiquitous file format, but that's the key and I think you can see where I'm going.

    If user data is hosted elsewhere and if various vendors can access and manipulate it while adding their own custom attributes and not interfering with the custom attributes of other vendors, we arrive at the happy place where Checkvist can remain simple and users have a potentially unlimited number of ways to view and manipulate their data.

  10. 172 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza supported this idea  · 
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    The circular reference concern can be handled in several ways.

    1) Don't allow them
    2) Don't preload symlinks; dynamically expand them as users opens them and don't allow them to open items already appearing above in the node hierarchy

  11. 2 votes
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    Mario T. Lanza commented  · 

    As lists can be assigned tags, I recommend using tags for indicating the kind of list. These tags will show up in the view that shows active lists.